1961 – 1965

1 RAR was back in Holsworthy and for the next four years trained as a pen-tropic unit with five rifle companies, each with four platoons. Each platoon had four sections which meant a lot of bush time learning how to manage what could become a cumbersome, unwieldy body for the junior leaders. This gave the battalion a total strength of about 1300 men. Major exercises such as Nutcracker (1962), Dry Sky and Sky High (1963), Longshot and Skyhigh 2 (1964) were the major training activities during this period.

The Colo-Putty and Tianjara training areas were the main exercise areas. British units (the Royal Ulster Rifles), Canadian (Princess Patricia Light Infantry) and American units also trained with the Battalion. Exercises on the south coast of NSW with the LCM “Clive Steel” and at Puccapunyal with the tanks (centurion) introduced the battalion to new areas of training.

The battalion provided honour guards as required and the House Guard at Government House during the Royal visit in 1963. Volunteers were called for in 1963 to be foundation members of the new 4 RAR being raised in Adelaide. These men left in December and 4RAR was raised on the 1st February 1964.

The RAR had four regular battalions in 1964. These were the 1st – 2nd – 3rd and 4th Battalions. In March 1965 permission was given to expand the Royal Australian Regiment to seven Battalions. The new Battalions were named the 5th – 6th – 7th Battalions and the experienced soldiers to man them came from the 1st – 2nd – and 3rd Battalions respectively. 5 RAR was raised on 1st March 1965.

NATIONAL SERVICE

The Cabinet of the Federal Government decided on the 5th November 1964 to introduce a compulsory (selective) national service scheme and on the 10th November the Prime Minister, Mr. R G Menzies announced that decision in the House of Representatives. The National Service Act 1964 was passed into law on the 24th November 1964, which required 20 year old men to register for service in the Defence Forces for a period of two years. Prime Minister Holt announced in March 1966 that National Servicemen would be sent to Vietnam to fight in units of the Australian Regular Army.

The National Servicemen were given twelve weeks initial training at 1st Recruit Training Battalion at Kapooka, NSW; 3rd R.T.B. at Singleton, N.S.W.; or 2nd R.T.B. at Puckapunyal, Victoria. Most were sent to the Infantry, which allowed the Army to increase the Royal Australian Regiment to nine Battalions.

OTU at Scheyville trained 1639 National Servicemen who were commissioned as second lieutenants, many of whom served in the Infantry.

From 30th June 1965 to 7th December 1972, 63,735 National Servicemen were called up for fulltime service. 150 of these men served in Borneo (2 Killed) and 19,450 served in Viet Nam. (210 Killed) Some of these men served in 1 RAR during the second tour 1968-1969.

Opposition to conscription and Australia’s involvement in the Vietnam War began to rise and demonstrations against the government (lead by the unions and the ALP) split the nation.


1st Battalion

The Royal Australian Regiment

Ceremonial Parade
on the occasion of

Trooping the Colour

At

Gallipoli Barracks
HOLSWORTHY

at 11.00 hours .31st July, 1963

Reviewing Officer:  Lieutentant-General J. G. N. Wilton, C.B., C.B.E., D.S.O.
Chief of the General Staff

THE COLOURS

The Colours embody the history, spirit and tradition of the unit to which they belong. They are highly valued, carefully guarded and treated with respect.

The custom of carrying Colours has its origin in ancient and medieval times when, during battle, warring factions carried flags bearing family badges or armorial bearings to show the positions of commanders and to serve as rallying points.

Since 1751, regiments have been allowed two Colours only, the Queen’s (or King’s) Colour and the Regimental Colour. Although no longer carried into battle, Colours remain a symbol of the Regiment, for on them are borne the Battle Honours granted in recognition of gallant deeds performed by its members. Because of their historic and symbolic significance, Colours are always consecrated before being presented and taken into use.

Thereafter, the Queen’s and Regimental Colours serve as a constant reminder to all members of that unit of their duty to their Sovereign and their Country.

Note: On this occasion the Regimental Colour only will be trooped.

HISTORICAL NOTE

The ceremony is derived from the Roman custom of parading the Eagle each night on coming into camp. During the seventeenth century this custom was revived in the “lodging” of the Colour, which took place each evening just before dusk. The Ensign carrying the Colour accompanied by his escort would march through the ranks of the Regiment before placing it in the Colonel’s billet for the night.

The object of this was twofold: first, to acquaint each soldier with the Colour which he followed and, secondly, to show him where it was lodged so that, in event of an alarm being given, he would know where to rally.

In England, during the eighteenth century, the Regiments of Foot Guards on public duties used to “Troop” the Colour, which was carried on the King’s Guard.

It is from this custom that the ceremony of Trooping the Colour, in its present form, originates.

STAFF of HEADQUARTERS

1 st Bn The ROYAL AUSTRALIAN REGIMENT

Commanding Officer – Colonel C M I PEARSON MC
Executive Officer – Lieutenant Colonel J B M TRENERRY
General Staff Officer 2 – Major A L MORRISON MBE
Deputy Assistant Adjutant
and Quartermaster General – Major D M RAMSAY

OFFICERS AND WARRANT OFFICERS ON DUTY

Officer Commanding the Parade
Lieutenant Colonel J B M TRENERRY

Adjutant
Captain E A CHITHAM

Quartermaster
Captain T J BUCKLEY

Regimental Sergeant Major
Warrant Officer 1 J D McKAY MM

No 1 Guard (Escort for the Colour)                        No 2 Guard
B Company                                                                  A Company

Major J A WARR                                                      Major R R HANNIGAN
Lieutenant I J C HEARN                                        Lieutenant G F WALKER
2nd Lieutenant W J GILES                                    2nd Lieutenant D R BYERS
(Ensign)
Company Sergeant Major                                      Company Sergeant Major
N GOLDSPINK                                                        L J O’KEEFE

No 3 Guard                                                               No 4 Guard
(C Company)                                                            (Support Company)

Major M LANDER                                                  Major C M TOWNSEND
Lieutenant D F PAUL                                            Lieutenant J INNES
2nd Lieutenant R W SUPPLE                              2nd Lieutenant S ZAGON
Company Sergeant Major                                     Company Sergeant Major
W HILL                                                                     D C MUIR

Troops Keeping the Ground (D Company, E Company, Air Borne Platoon)

Commander Major G O THOMPSON

Officers

Lieutenant R M GILL
Lieutenant M G BARWICK
Lieutenant P M ARNISON
2nd Lieutenant K A ANDERSON
2nd Lieutenant R B FRENCH
Company Sergeant Major G E WEASE
Company Sergeant Major J CLARKE

ORDER of CEREMONY

The Ceremony opens with the four Guards drawn up in line.

The Drums will beat the assembly. At this time the officers, warrant officers and senior non commissioned officers will assemble opposite their guards. The origin of this custom is that, at the time of assembly, Guard Commanders and their subordinates met, received their orders and passwords, and drew lots for Guards.

The Officer Commanding the Parade will order the officers, warrant officers, and senior non commissioned officers to take post in slow time. This movement is attributed to George III who ordered it to test the sobriety of his officers.

The Reviewing Officer, Lieutenant General J G N WILTON CB CBE DSO, Chief of the General Staff, will drive on to the parade and will be received by a General Salute.

The Officer Commanding the Parade will order the “Troop” to commence. The Band and Drums will play a Slow March from the right to the left of the line and a Quick March from the left to the right of the line.

The Escort for the Colour, in a position of honour on the right of the line, is summoned to duty by the Drummer’s Call. The Escort will move out and halt opposite the Colour, which will then be trooped down the line of Guards.

The Guards will march past the Reviewing Officer in slow and quick time and then form up again in line.

The Parade will Advance in Review Order and then the Reviewing Officer will receive a General Salute.

As the Reviewing Officer prepares to depart he will be given a General Salute.

After the Colour has been marched off parade, the Guards will march off.

Notice to Spectators

Spectators are requested to stand, and gentlemen in mufti are requested to remove their hats on the following occasions:

I . When the Colour passes to the immediate front.

2. When the Colour is marched off parade.

PROGRAMME OF MUSIC

to be performed by

THE BAND OF THE FIRST BATTALION

THE ROYAL AUSTRALIAN REGIMENT
on the occasion of
Trooping the Colour
on
31st July 1963

Bandmaster

Warrant Officer 1 N A VINES

Drum Major

Sergeant G BEKENDAM

Battalion March On – IMPERIAL ECHOES
Officers and Warrant Officers Take Post – THE REGIMENTAL COLOUR
General Salute – GENERAL SALUTE
Inspection – MARCH FROM ‘AIDA’
The Troop:
Slow March – HIS MAJESTY
Quick March – THE COMMONWEALTH
Escort for the Colour – BRITISH GRENADIERS
Salute to the Colour – DUKE OF YORK
Trooping the Colour – GRENADIERS SLOW MARCH
The March Past (in slow time) – BY LAND AND SEA
The March Past (in quick time) – WALTZING MATILDA
The Advance in Review Order – BRITISH GRENADIERS
General Salute – GENERAL SALUTE
General Salute – GENERAL SALUTE
Colour March Off – WALTZING MATILDA
Battalion March Off – SOUTH WEST


Sport and skill at marksmanship competitions and promotion courses were a high priority. The RSM at the time was WO 1 “Macca” McKay who ruled with an iron glove. Most men thought he was 6 feet 6 inches (2 metres) tall and did not find out until many years later he was only 5 feet 10 inches.

The Commanding Officers during this period were Col K R G Coleman, MC – Col C M I Pearson, MC – Col D B Dunstan, MBE.

Handover from Colonel Coleman to Colonel Pearson 1962

LtCol I R W Brumfield was appointed CO on 1st March 1965 with the task of reorganising, training and equipping 1 RAR to prepare for tropical war. The battalion was warned for overseas service on the 29th April 1965 when Prime Minister Menzies announced in parliament that 1 RAR would be sent to South Viet Nam.

John Donald McKay, 39th Battalion WW2

RSM 1 RAR WO 1 “Macca” J D McKay, DSM, MM

Born 1923 – Enlisted 1940 (39th battalion) – Kokoda (39th battalion) – Military Medal (9th August 1942, Kokoda, age 19) – Discharged 1946 – Re-enlisted 1950 – Instructor 15th National Service Battalion, Puckapunyal – RSM 3rd Cadet Brigade – Instructor School of Infantry at Seymour – WO1 instructor at the Infantry Centre 1960 (Produced the Drill Manual for the Army) – RSM 1 RAR 1963 to 1965 (including SVN) – RSM 23 cadet Battalion, Melbourne 1966 to 1968 – RSM 1 PIR, Port Moresby 1968 to 1970 – RSM Australia House, London 1970 to 1972 – RSM Southern Command 1973 to 1974.

Mortar training 1965 Holsworthy

WO 1 “Macca” McKay, DSM, MM and Brig “Lou” Brumfield, CBE, DSO
1 RAR reunion 1985

1 RAR Band

4 Platoon

15 Platoon D Coy 1964

Chopper Training 1964

Training in the Asian Village Holsworthy – 1962 / 63

Colours on parade Holsworthy 1964

CSM Spt Coy Jack Currie and crew

D Coy 1 RAR Holsworthy December 1964

1 RAR supplied the Honour Guard for the funeral
Mr. Frank Partridge, VC

A Coy being inspected by the Governor General Lord De L’Isle

The CO, Col Dunstan inspecting the battalion

Officers Mess Holsworthy 1964

Battalion Parade 1963

Ready for Viet Nam 1965

Sgt Stokes – Sgt Jordan – WO2 Christianson

Sgt Tobin and crew

S/Sgt Bowen “Wyatt Earp” and Cpl Reg Charlsworth “Keg Eyes”

Subject 2 for Cpl

1 RAR Jazz Band

B Coy being inspected

Bearer Party for Lt Col Madden, MBE 1964

Funeral Party

Chris Durbridge and PM Gorton

Battalion Parade 1963

1 RAR band marching at the Warwick Farm Racecourse 1963

1 RAR band marching through Liverpool 1963

Admin Coy Swimming Team 1963

Frank Baker and Peter Vandenberg

1 R A R BAND AT INFANTRY CENTRE INGLEBURN

BACK ROW L / R

CURLEY HURLEY , JIM HARPER , MERVYN WILSON K.I.A. , LES TAIT ,TED

BROMFIELD , DIGBY LAWRENCE , PETER VANDENBERG ,FRANK BAKER ,

ROY HARBACH , JOHN NICOLA , COLIN PRICE , CLIVE SPRAGG , LEN

DODDS , MICKEY ROONEY , JOHN NICOLA , GERRY BECKENDAM.

FRONT ROW L / R

NICK PEET , LEO FARLEY ? , TOM GILLIGAN , PHIL GRAHAM , NEVILLE

GRAHAM , KEN KELLY , WALLY BROWN , GEORGE WILSON

, BARRY BENCE , GEORGE DELACEY

BAKER FRANK, SIDE DRUM, CYMBALS
SMITH DAVID, TENOR HORN TENOR DRUM
VANDENDBERG PETER, SIDE DRUM BARITONE
NICOLA JOHN, TENOR HORN
NICOLA JAMES, SIDE DRUM, GUITAR
HARBACK ROY, SIDE DRUM
DOYLE KEITH, SIDE DRUM
KELLY KEN L/CPL, PERCUSSION
HORE ROBERT L/CPL, BASS
LAWRENCE DIGBY CPL, TROMBONE
FLEMING JOHN, BASS DRUM
PHILLIPS IVAN, SIDE DRUM
BORDEAUX JOSEPH, SIDE DRUM, TENOR HORN
WALKER GEORGE, TENOR HORN,BARITONE
SPENCER BARRY, TENOR HORN, SAXAPHONE
MASON WILLIAM, PIXIE CORNET

BECKANDAM GERRY, DRUM MAJOR
VINES NOEL, BANDMASTER
GRAHAM NEVILLE , L/CPL BARITONE
BENCE BARRY L/CPL, E# B # BASS
TAIT LESLIE L/CPL, PIANO, TROMBONE
BROMFIELD EDWARD CPL, TROMBONE
GILLIGAN THOMAS CPL, EPHONIUM
HARPER JIM L/CPL, CORNET
HARROP JOHN, E# B # BASS
CUTTING WILLIAM, PERCUSSION
SPRAGG CLIVE, CORNET
QUIRK WILLIAM, PERCUSSION 1965
ROBBINS MARTY, BARITONE
DODDS LEN, CORNET
KERRIGAN PATRICK CPL, E# B# TROMBONE
MANN WILLIAM, FLUGAL HORN

KEATCH ROBERT, TENOR HORN
BROWN WALTER, E# B # BASS
EVANS DENNIS, FLUGAL HORN
GRACIAN THOMAS, EPHONIUM
WILSON MERVYN, TENOR HORN
CLARK CHRIS, SIDE DRUM
WEDGEWOOD BRIAN, BASS DRUM
HARLEY CURLY B / SGT, SOPRANO CORNET
DELACEY GEORGE, E# B # BASS
POOLE MICHAEL, TENOR HORN
LIGHTFOOT JOHN, CYMBALS
WATTS JOHN, SIDE DRUM, CORNET
GRAHAM PHILLIP JPJ, BASS
KERR JOHN, CORNET
ROSE ALAN, TENOR DRUM, SIDE DRUM
PRICE COLIN, CORNET
McKENZIE PETER, TENOR HORN

Nominal roll of 1 RAR band members 1961- 1964

THE MT KINDRED RYTHEM ROCKERS ON EXERCISE NUTCRACKER

L-R ARE NICK PEET (GUITAR)? WALKER, FRANK BAKER DRUMS, JOHN FLEMMING (SLAP BASS), IVAN PHILLIPS ( IN WHITE HAT ) MOUTH ORGAN,( CPL OR SOME TIMES SGT ) REGINALD CHARLESWORTH ADM COY (MONEY LENDER SCOUNDREL ETC) (MOUTH ORGAN ), MERVYN WILSON KIA VIETNAM 1965-66 (PRUNE TINS)

Band information and Photos supplied by Frank Baker

Honour Guard for the King and Queen of Thailand

Parade for the King and Queen of Thailand

M60 Training

Pte Ernie Hemingway, ANZAC Day 1965

Training at RAAF Richmond 1964

1964 Holsworthy

1964 – 1 RAR was a Pentropic Battalion with 4 platoons per Company

3Pl A Coy 1965 – 1 RAR had a tropical establishment of 3 Pl per Coy

1966-1968

1 RAR again reformed in Gallipoli Barracks Holsworthy after a well earned period of leave. Lt Col K P Outridge was the new Commanding Officer. The Battalion built up strength with an influx of national servicemen and training exercises began in the Holsworthy range / close training area. A large number of “old hands” were posted to other units.

This was a period with many ceremonial occasions (funeral services for KIA from other units in Vietnam) and the biggest being a guard of honour in late Sep 1966 for Lyndon B. Johnson, President of the United States.

The Battalion moved from the old Gallipoli Barracks to the Finshchafen Lines in the new barracks complex on the Easter weekend of 1967. It was during this move that LtCol P H Bennett assumed command of 1 RAR. The remainder of 1967 was spent on exercise and preparation for the second tour of Vietnam.

Exercise “Grass Parrot” and hard close quarter training in the close training area followed with leave being granted over the Christmas period. The battalion advance party departed for Vietnam on the 17th March 1968.

1968-1969 – Vietnam (See 1 RAR Campaigns)

1969-1971

1 RAR returned to Australia and marched through the streets of Sydney on the 28th February 1969. Members went of leave and the battalion prepared to move to Malaysia. Lt Col J B M Trenerry was the new Commanding Officer from 1st March 1969.
The battalion moved to Terendak at Malacca, Malaysia in April 1969.